May 21, 2017

It’s hard to believe that the school year is coming to an end. Here are two important dates for you to remember:

Friday, May 26th – All ILL books must be returned so I can get them back to the libraries we borrowed them from

Friday, June 2nd – Last day of the year for book check-outs. I’ll need to spend the next few weeks wrangling all the books back to do a proper inventory of our materials

Although the school year is winding down, I will still be recommending titles that students can borrow from the public library. It’s never too early to start making a summer reading list!

The Great Big Boom (HiLo 3), (2017)

by Judd Winick

hilo3

Goodreads summary: HILO s BA-ACK in this funny “New York Times “bestselling full-color middle-grade graphic novel series that Bone creator Jeff Smith calls delightful and Big Nate author Lincoln Peirce says every kid will love!
HiLo may look like an ordinary kid, but he’s DEFINITELY not! When we last saw HiLo, DJ, and Gina, Gina had been sucked into a mysterious portal to who knows where! But friends don’t let friends disappear into NOWHERE! It’s up to D.J. and HiLo to follow her. Will there be danger? YES! Will there be amazing surprises? OF COURSE! Will Gina end up being the one to save them? DEFINITELY! With the help of Polly, the magical warrior cat, the friends will have to battle bad guys and face disgusting food, an angry mom, powerful magic, and more! Will they survive . . . and make it back to Earth before the portal closes again?! Find out in the third HiLo adventure!”

Watch the original HiLo book trailer with author/illustrator Judd Winick.

Giant Trouble (Hamster Princess 4), (2017)

by Ursula Vernon

gianttrouble

Goodreads summary: A magical beanstalk leads to a GIANT surprise in book four of the series that s chock-full of girl power and perfect for fans of Princess in Black and Babymouse.

Princess Harriet Hamsterbone doesn’t go looking for trouble. She prefers to think of it as looking for adventure. But when she climbs to the top of an enormous beanstalk and sneaks into the castle at the top, Harriet finds plenty of both. The castle is home to one very poetically challenged giant rabbit with two unusual prisoners a girl who is half harp, half hamster, and an extremely large goose. This calls for a heroic rescue, and Harriet is just the hamster for the job.
The fourth installment of the critically acclaimed Hamster Princess series turns the story of Jack and the Beanstalk upside down, with plenty of laughs along the way.”

Watch a book trailer for the Hamster Princess series.

Strong Inside (Young Readers Edition): The True Story of How Perry Wallace Broke College Basketball’s Color Line, (2016)

by Andrew Maraniss

stronginside.jpg

Goodreads summary: The inspirational true story of the first African American to play college basketball in the deeply segregated Southeastern Conference–a powerful moment in Black history.
Perry Wallace was born at an historic crossroads in U.S. history. He entered kindergarten the year that the Brown v. Board of Education decision led to integrated schools, allowing blacks and whites to learn side by side. A week after Martin Luther King Jr.’s -I Have a Dream- speech, Wallace enrolled in high school and his sensational jumping, dunking, and rebounding abilities quickly earned him the attention of college basketball recruiters from top schools across the nation. In his senior year his Pearl High School basketball team won Tennessee’s first racially-integrated state tournament.
The world seemed to be opening up at just the right time, and when Vanderbilt University recruited Wallace to play basketball, he courageously accepted the assignment to desegregate the Southeastern Conference. The hateful experiences he would endure on campus and in the hostile gymnasiums of the Deep South turned out to be the stuff of nightmares. Yet Wallace persisted, endured, and met this unthinkable challenge head on. This insightful biography digs deep beneath the surface to reveal a complicated, profound, and inspiring story of an athlete turned civil rights trailblazer.

Watch the Strong Inside book trailer.

I loved Orphan Train. This week I read Orphan Train Girl to ensure it was appropriate for our students. I’m happy to say they did a really nice job turning it into a young readers edition.

Orphan Train Girl, (2017)

by Christina Baker Kline

orphantraingirl

Goodreads summary: 

This young readers’ edition of Christina Baker Kline’s #1 New York Times bestselling novel Orphan Train follows a young foster girl who forms an unlikely bond with a ninety-one-year-old woman. Adapted and condensed for a young audience, Orphan Train Girl includes an author’s note and archival photos from the orphan train era.

Molly Ayer has been in foster care since she was eight years old. Most of the time, Molly knows it’s her attitude that’s the problem, but after being shipped from one family to another, she’s had her fair share of adults treating her like an inconvenience. So when Molly’s forced to help an elderly woman clean out her attic for community service, Molly is wary. Just another adult to treat her like a troublemaker.

But from the very moment they meet, Molly realizes that Vivian, a well-off ninety-one-year-old, isn’t like any of the adults she’s encountered before. Vivian asks Molly questions about her life and actually listens when Molly responds. Molly soon sees they have more in common than she thought. Vivian was once an orphan, too—an Irish immigrant to New York City who was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children—and she can understand, better than anyone else, the emotional binds that have been making Molly’s life so hard. Together, they not only clear boxes of past mementos from Vivian’s attic, but forge a path of friendship, forgiveness, and new beginnings for their future.

Watch the book trailer for Orphan Train.

Pedal Power: How One Community Became the Bicycle Capital of the World, (2017)

by Allan Drummond

pedalpower

Goodreads summary: Bikes rule the road in Amsterdam today, but that wasn’t always the case. In the 1970’s, Amsterdam was so crowded with vehicles that bicyclists could hardly move, but moms and kids relied on their bikes to get around the city. PEDAL POWER is the story of the people who led protests against the unsafe streets and took over a vehicles-only tunnel on their bikes, showing what a little pedal power could do! Author and illustrator Allan Drummond returns with the story of the people that paved the way for safe biking around the world.

Check out Allan Drummond’s website.

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